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GILESGATE

St Giles church was dedicated by Bishop Flambard on 11th June 1112 [5], but it was noted as being built between 1141 and 1144. It was once used as a military stronghold, as it had to withstand a siege [6]. It was at one time surrounded by a trench. Only the north wall of this original building is still standing.

St Godric, afterwards famous as the Hermit of Finchale, was once a bellringer at the church. Some building extension or repairs took place in 1414 as Cardinal Langley granted an indulgence of 40 days for all persons contributing to the repair of St Giles church [21].

Kepier was surrendered to the King's commissioners in 1545, and thus passed into lay hands. After this it no longer flourished. The chapel of St Mary Magdalen was founded by Sir John Fitz Alexander and rebuilt in 1370 to 1449. It was finally used for public worship in the last decade of the 17th century. It is now in a ruinous condition.

During the Victorian era, those released from prison had difficulty in finding employment. The prison chaplain in 1840, George Hans Harrison, formed an informal society. One of its products was the Penitentiary, situated north of Gilesgate towards the Sands, opened in 1853. This was founded and maintained by public support, with support from Dean Waddington, and the local MP Roland Burdon.

Gilesgate Community Centre was once the home of the famous Seaham family, called the Vane Tempest Hall.

Coal was worked to the east of Durham near Kepier Woods. At the collieries of Kepier, Kepier Grange and Grange. The last pit to close was Kepier Grange in 1924, after 80 years of workings. The Kepier colliery was north to Glue Garth on the Sunderland road [5] with a branch line to the Newcastle and Darlington junction railway which ran to Gilesgate station [29]. This colliery was closed in the early 1900’s [2]9. The Kepier Grange and Grange collieries were situated just north of the village of Carrville, either side of the same Newcastle and Darlington junction railway.

The first railway station in Durham was opened in 1844 on the north side of Gilesgate. It was connected to the main Newcastle to London line at Belmont Junction. Before this was opened, the nearest railway station was a mile away at Shincliffe, where the Durham and Sunderland Railway had a station in 1839 to 1893. Gilesgate station itself became a goods station in 1857 and finally closed in 1966.

Gilesgate: About
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GILESGATE


St Bedes (for men) and St Hilds (for women) were formally Diocesan teacher training colleges 1 and are noted as near to the Heights of Pelaw [6].


In 1921 the football team gained election to the Northern section of the Third League. Games were held in the vicinity of Kepier Hospital, but attendances were low due to the distance from the city. A new ground was opened called Holidays’ Park (after the chairman), and this was at Sidegate nearer to Framwellgate bridge [6].


List of businesses as listed in 1924 [6]

Edmund Heslop

Merchant tailor

Gilesgate


Porters

Wholesale suppliers

Gilesgate

Durham Ox Inn

Public House c.1965

39 Gilesgate

Grand Junction

Public House

45 Gilesgate

Railway Tavern

Public House

47 Gilesgate

Thomas Kipling

Coal Merchant

51 Gilesgate

Joiners Arms

Public House

54 Gilesgate

Brewers Arms

Public House

82 Gilesgate

Britannia Inn

Public House

85 Gilesgate

John Lowes & Son

Buildings Merchant

85 Gilesgate

Cantech Inn

Public House

97 Gilesgate

Smith Arms

Public House

103 Gilesgate

Bay Horse Inn

Public House

110 Gilesgate

Durham Light Infantryman

Public House

111 Gilesgate

Nags Head

Public House

204 Gilesgate

Royal Oak Inn

Public House

204 Gilesgate

Burton Hotel

Public House

215 Gilesgate

Volunteer Arms

c.1965

Gilesgate Bank.

Gilesgate: About
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